martes, julio 17, 2012

Fifth Puerto Rico, MIYAMA RYU Combat Jujutsu Seminar, Julio 2012.

Dear Aiki Friends and Fellow Budoka

Greetings from Mayaguez, Puerto Rico.

It is my hope this E-mail finds each one of you enjoying of good health and spirit.

I would like to extend a personal invitation to you and your students to attend the fifth Puerto Rico MIYAMA RYU Combat Jujutsu Seminar scheduled on Saturday, July 28th from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Instructed by Dai-Shihan WILLIAM DUKE, Co-Headmaster of MIYAMA RYU Combat Jujutsu. Duke Sensei is a highly skilled Jujutsu practitioner and instructor, and was one of Shinan Antonio Pereira's first Dai-Shihan. The Seminar will be held at the Shushinkan Dojo in Mayaguez, Puerto Rico.

The origins of MIYAMA RYU Combat Jujutsu stretch back over half a century. In 1942 Antonio Pereira, a young American soldier, was participating in a hand-to-hand demonstration. When ordered to punch one of the instructors in the face, he complied, only to find himself whipped around into a chokehold.

During World War II, Pereira Sensei learned as much as he could about specialized combat methods. He continued to experiment and practice with the techniques, refining them sometimes under life and death situations.

After the war, his warrior's quest for additional knowledge took him to many schools in search of martial prowess. In 1950 he began a formal study of Judo with the Lefcoker brothers. He began to research how victims of crime were attacked and devise methods of practical defense.

In 1960 he opened a martial arts school on Tremont Avenue, in the South Bronx, New York. He called his rough-and-tumble method of fighting Combato. But the puzzle was still not complete.

In 1962 he embarked on a journey to Japan. His plan was to study from the source, and perhaps to gain a better sense of the martial principles.

As he observed the practice at the Aiki Kai (Aikido school), Pereira recognized similarities to what he had been doing all along. Pereira set out to learn the more refined methods.

His fierce resolve and dedication won him many honors. Among them were a teaching certificate from then-Doshu Kisshomaru Ueshiba (son of the founder of Aikido), and a Ni Dan in Judo from the Kodokan (the birth place of Judo).

Pereira returned to the United States and resumed teaching at the Tremont School. Periera would later earn a San Mokuroku in Sosuishitsu Ryu Jujutsu, a Koryu (Jujutsu), from the then current Headmaster-Shitama Sensei.

Knowing that the Western life style and philosophy differs from the Eastern, he adapted the physical techniques and mind set of the Samurai Warrior to the culture of the dangerous streets of the modern, urban South Bronx.

In effect, he created one of the few combat methods suited for today's streets. He combined elements of Judo, Aikido, Koryu Jujutsu, Karate, Boxing, and the less organized, but no less effective element of Western street-style fighting.

In 1964 he formalized the name of his eclectic method MIYAMA RYU Jujutsu, which means School of the Three Mountains in English, or Tremont in French. This was the avenue on which the school was located.

In 1973 Pereira Sensei researched the classical ranking system of Japanese systems. He decided to use the ranking structure and nomenclature of the Japanese martial arts, both classical and modern. He took the title of Shinan.

Shinan Pereira died in 1999 and with him the era of Tremont as the center of MIYAMA RYU came to an end. MIYAMA RYU Combat Jujutsu has branched out from the tough streets of the South Bronx to several countries on several continents.

Not only is MIYAMA RYU Combat Jujutsu taught to civilians, but it has been used in the design of courses for United States Federal agents, taught at police and law enforcement academies across the world and is still being refined today by two Dai-Shihans, D'Arcy Rahming and Dr. WILLIAM DUKE, and an international Executive Committee led by Shihan Robert Aviles Sr.

In the Spirit of Budo Friendship, we are not charging Seminar Fees in hopes of building future friendships and good will in the Martial Arts Community in Puerto Rico. Voluntary contributions will be accepted.

I am personally looking forward to see you at this Seminar. If you have any questions, please feel free to contact me at any time.

Yours in the Spirit of Increasing Excellence in Budo,

Shihan Bolivar Ramirez
Headmaster of Shushinkan Aiki-Budo
http://www.Shushinkan.com/
http://Shushinkan.tumblr.com/

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